Scholarships, the Problem of Losing Natural Talent, the Perils of Working on a Committee…. and Shrimp Po Boys.

My 21yr old son, Gunner, was talkative last night. For over three hours, moving through topics with the greatest of ease, he drifted from gun ownership, to Antifa, to cheating in college, dating in the age of feminism, the hiring process, Russian submarine disaster, big tech, Microsoft versus Linux systems, H1B visas, and Fed Monetary Policy…. along with a LOT of anecdotal engineering (his discipline) stories thrown into the mix. He was animated and persuasive. Mostly, Big T and I listened.
Understand, my husband, when in law school, placed 2nd nationally for mock trial and was a Boston trial lawyer for 23yrs = highly verbal. I was a statewide debate and extemporaneous speaking champ = highly verbal. You have to FIGHT to get a word in edgewise in our house, AND with four stepsisters, Gunner had plenty of competition. Last night, however, he took the floor. When he went to bed, I was left…….. impressed. Kind of like that moment when you see your kids as an adult – it’s spooky.
He’s going to be fine. As far as his readiness to enter the real world, he’s like a casserole with only 5 minutes left on the oven timer….. almost done…. bubbling with possibilities……. and the delicious aroma of his potential makes my mouth water with anticipation.
During the conversation last night, my son expressed concern about various particular students and their struggles with money…. not the pizza and beer money…. but the money for an apartment/dorm, tuition and books. He wondered why they did not have scholarships or plan their future …. more prudently. Objectively, he acknowledged his viewpoint may be unfair, because our family was extremely focused on paying for college, both in saving money and applying for scholarships. Many families are not so keen to the idea. He didn’t however, think it was an excuse for the students, who are ultimately responsible. In his opinion, “Who the hell signs onto a $200K debt or committment with no plan to pay it back?” He couldn’t understand why more students did not hunt and apply for scholarships to ease their financial burden.
We’re not talking about average students either. These are kids over a 30 Composite on the ACT and in the 700’s on SAT’s. These are the kids who should have many scholarships and be in honor societies, no reason not to have them. He reasoned, if they worked so hard to excel in their studies, they should have thought more about the expense of college. To be reasonable however, some of them came from less fortunate families, or are first in their family to attend a university.
One of Gunner’s best friends, Kenny (not his real name) is a black male with super-high test scores. Kenny is an academic unicorn – a rare treasure, and my son loves him like he’s his own brother. Kenny had to drop out of college, flunked out, because he could not handle the social pressures, a Chem major, and the physical requirements of ROTC. In my son’s opinion, “The world needs guys like Kenny and we’re ALL worse off because Kenny didn’t make it.” My son emphatically stated, “If Kenny had been in our family, his real brother, with support, little bit of discipline, and consequences, Kenny would have finished successfully.” Unfortunately, Kenny had no one to count on, and no one to whom an answer was required. My son was correct, however, we all are worse off because of the failure.
The real reason Kenny failed = Kenny just wanted to be popular, for once, and not the egghead. Kenny partied too much….. flunked out…… and now works light construction…. when he can find work. Once full of hope, a provost scholar, and a rising star, Kenny is now desolate, no longer welcome in his mother’s home. It’s his own fault and he knows it. Tough lesson to learn…..lots of time and opportunity…… lost.
Again, our feeble attempt at solutions came back to finances, scholarships, and stability/security knowing the bills would be paid, even while on academic probation,….. and not overly burdensome upon graduation. To avoid the social pressures, Gunner suggested a stronger honor society, more work programs at school, friendships and mentoring, adopt-a-parent who will listen, within that group, to encourage good practices….., and a home cooked meal every now and then, instead of $1 shots on a Tuesday night. I know – I know, they’re supposed to be adults by age 18….. right?
And then, Gunner referred back to the FRC Scholarship problem, and how few applications were submitted, and what a mess the scholarship process has become. I nodded and remembered the fights and time spent on the process. It’s true, and I was dumbstruck by the low response for scholarship applications on a national level.
Here’s my story:
Gunner was in 9th grade. Our school had a little robotics team, first year, small robot, and a mini-grant for it, with a Robotics Advisor who actually stood up in church and said, “Technology is the Great Satan” Nahhhhh, it didn’t go over well with the kids. He also had a bad habit of looking down the girl’s blouses… for decades. In their first regional competition, they came in dead last— and landed at our house to graze food and organize a parent pickup. The boys, all of whom I had known since they were two years old, were furious and humiliated. I had never seen them so angry, and all angry at the same time. I asked them if they hated robotics and/or the competition, or if they were only angry because they didn’t know what they were doing. Unanimous vote, they wanted to stay, and win, AND be competent. Well then….. we had work to do.
Big T and I got involved in a major way. Team won state championship and placed #11/389 nationally in Orlando, and won the leadership award = big trophy we brought home. From 9th grade, with their success, the kids wanted to continue to another bigger team in 10th grade – but no advisor, no team, no nothing. Can’t take it away now, they were on a roll. We looked for options.
FRC was the granddaddy of robotics. They have thousands of teams all over the world. Their national championships are held in places like the Edward Jones Dome in St Louis or something like the Superdome in New Orleans, with teams from over 50 countries. It’s a big deal. The Black Eyed Peas played for halftime about 7yrs ago. Okay, sounds good, right? Gunner thought that was what we needed and I agreed. Why not? Yet, it’s expensive to buy in, $7-10K for first robot “kit” and a lot of manpower, facility to meet, tools to assemble, etc. I was convinced I could talk ex-husband into being the mentor, we just had to find the money.
Gunner learned NASA provides about 10 grants a year for FRC. Alrighty then, we had to win a grant……. a NASA grant….. among thousands who would compete. Big T wrote the first grant but it sounded like “Cause for War Declaration in the Middle East” – highly technical and boring. Gunner re-wrote (I helped) the grant and we won! We won a NASA grant, made the front page of the local paper. We also won another grant for a smaller robot for the Jr High, to mentor younger students and develop a “bench”. One thing led to another, Gunner became an Ambassador for NASA, manager of several pit crews (they have robotic pit crews like NASCAR), we traveled like crazy, and the advisor to NASA tucked us under his wing. Good guy to know. He changed my son’s life…..
Along the way, the USA Southeast Regional Chairwoman presumed I was somehow her competitor, …..smelled me breathing heavy at her heels. Huh??? She decided to throw me a bone and made me the Regional “Scholarship Chairman” for about 7 states and about 4500-6000 kids. I was honored, but clueless to her animosity…. never saw it coming. The kids were great, though! These students were science/tech focused, high performers, supported by their parents enough for travel and an expensive extra-curricular. She threw me a ‘Scholarship manual’ and a “Good luck with that”, and walked away. She dissed me out of the blue. I was blind-sided but miffed. Note taken. Payback is a bitch.
The guys and students worked on robots for months. Big T, the lawyer, who never touched so much as a weedeater before he met me, learned ALL ABOUT electrical wiring and socket wrenches with my ex-husband, the general contractor, who was at home in his wheelhouse. Oh my,   …… what a travel team they were. I gave them both credit to rise to the occasion for the kids. It was dicey at times. Me to Big T, “Honey, does it feel a little awkward checking into a hotel with my ex-husband?” His response, “Yeah, ya’ think?” That man is a blessing. At least they had different rooms.
Meanwhile, I dug into my new FRC volunteer position while working on the stone company and B&B. For good or bad, my personality is the very embodiment of a self-starter. With a little bit of authority, I can be dangerous….. but I am a benevolent dictator. Now, I was a Scholarship Chairman….. and I ran with it.
The kids on OUR team, we had about 50 by then, knew FRC offered 26 million dollars in scholarships at 168 top notch universities. Our kids were desperately looking for scholarships. Since we’re next door to the school, kids landed in my office (or kitchen) after school all the time, to talk about their future dreams, hopes, college, etc. My job was to connect student and university. Of course, Gunner was interested in obtaining a possible scholarship, BUT the program was a mess.
All that money, 26 million dollars, for kids who desperately needed it, and no easy way to connect them. After a few phone calls, I figured out the list was outdated, old contacts, bad phone numbers, etc. First thing to do was update the list — so I called 168 universities — and boy-oh-boy were they surprised to hear from me. Vast majority had not received a contact from our org in years. MOST were disappointed at the number of applications for scholarships their university was offering. Texas A&M reported 4 applications last year. Ga Tech, 7 applications and most unqualified. Brandeis, Cornell, NYU, UPenn, MIT, Lehigh, to Cal Poly, and Caltech, on and on it went.
The college admissions execs were keen for good applicants. They WANTED our kids. They wanted to figure out an easier way to get to the pool of our kids. Yet, if the scholarship is for electrical engineering, they didn’t want a humanities major to apply. The admissions officers were a little frustrated as well. We needed better matching of kid to scholarship and a higher profile for the program. “Okay sure”, I thought. I can do that!
Sooooooooo, I invited all 168 schools to our big regional in New Orleans for 3 days, and set up space for a college recruitment “row”. I printed elaborate invitations and followed up personally with phone calls. I didn’t ask for permission beforehand, but waited until I had 28 universities, with hotel and plane reservations confirmed, to casually “mention” the idea to my Chair, the witch. I wrecked her nerves. To be fair, she had enough to do with main organization of the event. I had “My portion under control, no worries.”, I said, but that just made her spit and stomp.
Big T and I also booked a suite at the hotel convention facility and offered to wine and dine the college recruiters the night before kick-off. Of course, I made Gumbo, lots of hors d’oeuvres, and the liquor flowed. It went VERY well……..
On day two, I was told, a college row “like this one” had never been done before….. “normally just a couple of locals”….. but I didn’t know that. Whoopsie Daisy! We had stacks and stacks of brochures and info from all 168 universities – and a few college mascots as well. It was great!
But then, there’s the important part……..
In prior months, I noticed a problem with the kids and their expectations about college – just at the local level, our kids, for our own school. They had so many questions, and no idea where to begin. Parents were confused as well. The misperceptions led to students ‘settling’ for less than their ideal choice, which is a shame. No reaching for a brass ring. Something had to be done.
To focus the kids, debunk the myths, and figure out what they really needed, I developed a “statistical study” as a starting point. I asked about 30 questions, single sheet of paper, open-ended, and printed up 4000 copies, distributing them to all entrants at our main event. I thought I might get lucky…… was hoping for 100 responses from the kids for a bigger sample …….. I received over 1200 returned surveys. Wow.
Like lightning striking, with a big clap of thunder, we were onto something bigger than I realized.
Kids and their parents swamped my table with questions……, even following me when I went to the bathroom, like I was the new Obi Wan Kenobi and carried the keys to college money. I wasn’t and I knew it. It was time for me to up my game. I was no college counselor – but I knew a 168 people who could point us in the right direction. Over three days, we practically rubber-stamped over 800K in scholarships and saved one scholarship worth $25K a year. Not bad ….. not bad at all…..
After I got home, I collated the results of the 1200 responses. I spent a weekend and manually entered 30 answers – and their notes, for all 1234 responses, to tabulate percentages and reach conclusions. I was stunned by the results. I produced what I thought was a fairly professional report on the raw results and conclusions I drew. Then, I sent the summary/report/raw results spreadsheet to several who were interested at the home office of FRC, all regional board members, and my bitch of a Chairwoman. Got a LOT of phone calls from the home office and a strong hint of job offer with a transfer BACK to Boston. Funny that!?!
Well, I was fired from my ‘volunteer’ job the following year by the Chairwoman. Wonder why?!?
BUT……. momma’s no fool. I kept my lists and contacts with college admission officers. We walked our kids through the process and dozens of them received scholarships. Gunner landed a few as well. He’s flush with cash and sitting pretty.
Almost a decade later, I still talk to some of those college recruiters. My list has worn edges but I still keep it handy. Team mentors who became friends still call me. Every now and then, a kid knocks on my door for help. I’m still no pro, but reading the scholarship directions carefully and making a phone call to an admissions officer is worth thousands of dollars to those kids. We…. someone…..  simply needs to take the time to listen to our kids, and match the students with the scholarships….. and many of them would no longer slip through the cracks. We need to find a way to hang onto the Kenny’s, for the benefit of us all.
It would help us build a better country.
PS – I wanted to add a pic to this post but didn’t want to include photos of student minors and other people who might object. So, here is a picture of the shrimp po boy I had for lunch in New Orleans. Q Tree loves good food. Nothing better than a “dressed” po boy.
Shrimp Po-Boy

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michaelh

Debt-Free U: How I Paid for an Outstanding College Education Without Loans, Scholarships, or Mooching off My Parents – August 31, 2010
by Zac Bissonnettecomment image
Paperback: 304 pages
Publisher: Portfolio; 1 edition (August 31, 2010)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1591842980
ISBN-13: 978-1591842989
Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.7 x 8.4 inches

This book can save you more than $100,000.
These days, most people assume you need to pay a boatload of money for a quality college education. As a result, students and their parents are willing to go into years of debt and potentially sabotage their entire financial futures just to get a fancy name on their diploma.
But Zac Bissonnette is walking proof that this assumption is not only false, but dangerous-a class con game designed to rip you off and doom your student to a post-graduation life of near poverty . From his unique double perspective-he’s a personal finance expert (at Daily Finance) AND a current senior at the University of Massachusetts-Zac figured out how to get an outstanding education at a public college, without bankrupting his parents or taking on massive loans.
Armed with his personal knowledge, the latest data, and smart analysis, Zac takes on the sacred cows of the higher education establishment. He reveals why a lot of the conventional wisdom about choosing and financing college is not only wrong but hazardous to you and your child’s financial future. You’ll discover, for instance, that:
* Student loans are NOT a necessary evil. Ordinary middle class families can- and must-find ways to avoid them, even without scholarships.
* College “rankings” are useless-designed to sell magazines and generate hype. If you trust one of the major guides when picking a college, you face a potential financial disaster.
* The elite graduate programs accept lots of people with non-elite bachelors degrees. So do America’s most selective employers. The name on a diploma ultimately won’t help your child have a more successful career or earn more money.
Zac can prove every one of those bold assertions – and more. No matter what your current financial situation, he has a simple message for parents: “RELAX! Your kid will be able to get a champagne education on a beer budget!”

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wolfmoon1776

WOW. I’m just – WOW. Tales from GEEK WARS! And a side of it that NOBODY ever sees! Very cool story.
And last but not least – NO GOOD DEED GOES UNPUNISHED. Right there!

Nor'easter

My personal version, for the purpose of double entendre:
“NO GOOD DEEDS GO UNPUNISHED”
Whereas:
“NO-GOOD” deeds (i.e. “EVIL” deeds) go UNPUNISHED;
AND
No “GOOD DEEDS” ESCAPE PUNISHMENT.

Plain Jane

All three of the grandkids who are now in college or grad school got from a full rides to $30K, and jobs x 3. We are so grateful to God for that. Hopefully all the other kids will make out also.
You are correct DNW, seeking out and knowing how to apply is a key. The HS counselors need to be on the ball with information also. There are too many kids who do not have parents who have a clue, time, nor incentive to help the kids. None of the kids had the financial “needs” that some scholarships require, and most people think that just because parents are fairly well heeled, they won’t be eligible anyway. Not so.

Plain Jane

Oh my, that is horrible. Has he overcome and forgiven? Hard to do.
Small world. GS was all accepted to either Annapolis or West Point, I can’t remember which. Wanted to be a fly boy. Had been saturated in aviation, war games, engineering, since a baby.
The zero military administration knocked him out because of a minor surgery at age 4. The surgery was the equivalent of a baby tooth extraction.
This child was adding, subtracting and multiplying negative numbers in his head when he was 5. Daughter and I weren’t very unhappy with the decision because neither of us wanted him to be doing the dirty work of Zero and the UN. We didn’t see PT on the horizon. God has other plans for our babies.

Plain Jane

Our GBs had a bunch of college creds under their belt before HS grad also. Those classes are priceless. Good HSs.
So sorry Gunner had to go through all that. I really wonder what God has up His sleeve for him. I hope it is awesome, and I believe it is.

B.b.S.s.Saint

Our oldest niece had somewhat of similar experience. She worked hard through high school, did all the extra curricular, and university level classes. Got accepted to the AFA and wanted to be a flight surgeon. Got to the academy and when doing push ups for PT, her arm and chest wall began to tremble and would not stop. She was medically waived, was given a year to seek medical help and return the following session. She did, and the trembling began all over again. She had to drop out and go onto another career. Now a human resources person for a national grocery chain. Like Plain Jane says God has different plans for us and our children. Finances and lack of knowledge as to what is needed to get or how to get money for college is a barrier to young people to get into or adults wanting to return to college. Daughn you are a treasure to your family and the town where you are. Blessings be upon you.

B.b.S.s.Saint

That’s what our niece said, she knew God must have a different plan. But, it is devastating to know he had it and one mistake cost it for him. Yah, has a better plan, I hope he pulls out of it too. It breaks a Mom’s heart to see our children so devastated. He had a strong up bringing, he will rally Daughn.

Deplorable Patriot

Our HS counselors sucked. There was no other way to put it. Because of my math grades, I was pushed to science/math fields. However, no one ever asked about other talents, like, uh, an operatic level voice, not that the music teacher would ever have mentioned it. Oh, no.
Really, I should have gone to a conservatory in Barcelona or Florence for voice performance, or at that time Indiana, but no. My family didn’t have it to send me there, and they didn’t think in terms of the arts as being a profession.
In the end, I worked at a university and one of the benefits was half price tuition to the night school. I have a piece of paper that says I spent a lot of time in a classroom and a lot of money. BS in communications. BUT, the upper level public relations and marketing classes have come in handy spotting all sorts of this conspiracy stuff.
And I also got real world experience at the age of formation. That’s one of the reasons I think apprenticeship would be more valuable for kids than straight up college and the hyper competitiveness. Skill development is more important than book learning, IMO.

Deplorable Patriot

Exactly. I am actually convinced, given my own experience and those of people with true vocations in the religious life, that if we were left alone to make the decision, it comes at age 15-16. The first thing that I wanted to do was write. My mother thought I was nuts. But, here I am making money as a blogger and author.

Deplorable Patriot

I had a music teacher who was jealous is what I had. I was not known as a singer in high school, even with a vaunted choral program. Once I started training, my voice didn’t blend – and I have to hide it now or I will cover choirs, choruses, and 80 piece orchestras – and this woman was what I call a “blendite.” It was a thing in music programs in the 70s and 80s. Honestly, I sang a funeral last year, and afterwards a HS classmate had waited for me. She was floored. She had no memory that I was a singer. Same thing happened at the last reunion when I told people I sang professionally.
One of the pitfalls of being in an all-girls school with women teachers. They play favorites. I was not one of the music teacher’s. She was not a religious, either. I got along better with the nuns.

Deplorable Patriot

Well, and this woman was young, too. In her 20s. She had an unusual combination of teaching credentials and so was valuable at the school. Her choruses and concerts were good, but she SUCKED as a Scripture teacher.

Deplorable Patriot

And I didn’t go to her for training, either, but the grand old lady of the local music scene, God rest her.

Deplorable Patriot

🙂 If I told you the number of times competition judges and directors yelled at me to NOT stand in third position…. “YOU ARE NOT A DANCER!” Sorry.

Deplorable Patriot

I still stand in third or fourth when I sing. The balance is just better. My knees don’t like it, but…

Deplorable Patriot

And that’s what makes me mad about seeing the arts as extra. It’s not. Not at all. Just as an example, we talk about why Catholics don’t sing, and all kinds of things are thought up about the basic reason why, but the truth is, it was not our tradition, and no one ever taught the young ones how. Now that the priests want it to be, and the pros start up programs, we get, “Oh, no, not the highbrow stuff” which was considered junk when it was written.
I could go on.

Deplorable Patriot

And then there’s the sculptor, and painters, etc. It’s a real problem, IMO.

Deplorable Patriot

Oh, yes. Math and music go hand in hand.

Plain Jane

DP, I sure do get what you say. I myself was screwed over in HS. My mom was brilliant, but had to quit school after only 2 years of HS because of the depression.
My dad as very well educated in Italy. When he died when I was 10, she had to goto work, and concentrate on keeping us in food, clothing and housing. She didn’t have the stamina to watch over our education, and didn’t know my potential.
The HS was a private Catholic HS that didn’t offer me opportunity except a good training in secretarial discipline. The HS, because I had to work full time to save money for the university stuck me in a study hall every semester instead of offering succeeding years of math and science along with the secretarial practices. When I got to the university, I didn’t even know how to light a bunsen burner, and had to play catch up on math ( couldn’t quite do such a crash study so I just got by). With math tutoring from DH, when I got to statistics, I aced the class. Sarc…Thanks HS counselors..study hall B S.

Plain Jane

If it could possibly change stupid practices in the HS s and their “counseling,” I would, but not even that HS is interested – still. Last year I tried to tell PR people who are hired by that HSbut it went in one ear and out the other. I donate a small amount yearly to their in house – university coordinated STEM scholarship, but I do it half heartedly.

Plain Jane

Wow. Wouldn’t it be nice if counselors were really trained in counseling. Just gonna get worse, because I’m guessing most of them are now getting saturated with psych stuff in their training from the lib universities, rather than the studies and planning aspects.

Deplorable Patriot

My mom tells a similar story of her own HS which was my grandparents’ choice (it was close and it was Catholic). The nuns there did not push the girls toward college. They were guided to secretarial options and streams. They were Mercy sisters.
My HS was taught by different orders, one that actually has a university here. From the inception of the school, it was always higher educated oriented. A lot of us graduated with college credit hours, but couldn’t type. I taught myself.
In retrospect, Mom probably would have been better off where I went, but education wasn’t the main priority in their house. Putting food on the table was.

Plain Jane

Yes, needing the basics of survival left a lot of people and talent in the weeds. Mom was a fantastic pianist. Had to stop lessons during the depression and I think, sell their piano. Lost grandma’s business also. The stories from that era are heartbreaking.

Plain Jane

I made all our kids take lessons. I took lessons for about 3 months when my dad died and the teacher moved and city busses didn’t go to his town. Mom didn’t drive.
My sister outgrew all local teachers and started taking lessons at a university in Chicago and got there by train. Since she was so advanced, my mom thought my sister could teach me. We pushed each other off the piano bench once too often. I gave up lessons.
I excelled in clothing construction and it was much needed in our matriarchy. So I got my kudos from that.
Since I already knew notes and basic timing, I picked up again as a teenager, but on my own just for fun…no teacher.

cthulhu

I see that Gunner has some thoughts about Linux v. Microsoft systems, but didn’t see any development in the post. As a usual commenter-to-commenter thing, we could go ’round and ’round.
Daughn — and regarding this issue only — it is OK to break the fourth wall and have Gunner contact me at the listed email address. Or contact me yourself. This is not for everybody regarding everything — I’ve burned my email down before and can do it again (and this is not my only email).

michaelh

Lulz I bet Gunner would have a blast with me at a party! Sounds like he’d do most of the talking!

GA/FL

IMO – Gunner won the lottery when the parents were chosen! And so did his parents!
Sounds like the world will be very blessed by what is to come from young Engineer Gunner!

GA/FL

….and I’m counting Big T in the equation too!

GA/FL

Of course he loves you all too….there’s going to be a little smoke and fire as his rocket lifts from its moorings. Then swoosh!!!

kalbokalbs

Great story Daughn.
So very, very good Kenny has Gunner for a friend. Following stuck out while reading your story, “Kenny is now desolate, no longer welcome in his mother’s home.” Guessing, Kenny’s father is not in his life either. Sad.
I do so hope, Kenny has family roots as he finds his way in life. Intelligent kid(s), OK, Kenny is an adult, like all kids, need good reliable family roots.

Coldeadhands

Bless you for securing a quality education for your son and others in an increasingly challenging environment.
The inflated condition of higher education is a condition afflicting our country. Too many are in pursuit of pointless degrees leading to unrelated jobs. All of this offered up on a plate by communist inspired lefties whose goal is to inculcate hatred for the United States in young impressionable minds.
The glut of students seeking useless degrees makes the cost for those seeking serious scholarship greater. This glut, with a few exceptions, also increases the size of the institutions and in turn increases the tax dollars going to these institutions.
Here’s hoping the President will succeed in increasing the viability of vocational education. This emphasis will need a change in the emphasis drift that has happened in early education.

Coldeadhands

Welding is a WONDERFUL SKILL!

singingsoul1

Daughn excellent topic.
Observation over the years America has the greatest opportunity for kids because all is free in school except University.
American kids are innovative bright but often lack self discipline. Many bright kids lack maturity and we keep them children way longer than our parents were kept. In the past people had to grow up faster than kids now. We spoil them coddle them until 18.
Not everyone but many what I have seen. They get everything without having to work for it.
I do not always blame teacher mine were not allowed to blame teachers but we knew what they learned in school and sublimated at home with books from the library.
My husband was hell bend that they had to go through High School the way he had in NYC in the Fifties. End result 2 had partial scholarships. Daughter in science had full scholarship. Keeping the scholarship was their responsibility. They kept them and 2 received free ride for their Master one at Northwestern the other in Kansas. The one in Medical School had to take up loans.
This is the best country ever just not to many Americans know it and embrace it and pass it on to their kids.
Of course all of you here know it 🙂

redlegleader68

OK, Daughn, cough up the location of that where you got that po boy!! It looks very familiar. I’m assuming Leidenheimer’s, right?
The Gulf Coast (Ocean Springs over to Long Beach) is not what it used to be. We were disappointed. It frankly –to us, at least– looks like they have never recovered from Katrina, lo these 14 years later. On the 3d and 4th of July the beaches were deserted. They had the annual fishing rodeo going on, but man-oh-man it was d.e.a.d.

redlegleader68

Oh, should have left this for everyone not familiar with New Orleans …
“George Leidenheimer came to New Orleans from Deidesheim, Germany, and founded the bakery that bears his name in 1896. The bakery was located on Dryades Street, but in 1904 it moved to the handsome brick building on Simon Bolivar Avenue where Leidenheimer’s descendants still operate the family business.
“Originally Leidenheimer baked the heavy, dense brown breads of his native Germany but it was by producing New Orleans French bread, with its crisp crust, that Leidenheimer found fame. Leidenheimer bread is still unique because over a century later it continues to be made using the same time-honored process. In a city like New Orleans, where eating is almost a religion, producing the perfect French bread is a sacred mission to the employees of Leidenheimer Baking Company.”

“In a city like New Orleans, where eating is almost a religion…” Not sure I wouldn’t edit out the word, “almost” … just sayin’ … 😉

redlegleader68

At Central Grocery, I’m sure!! Olive salad to die for …
STOP!! I’m getting hungry and I’m 500 miles away … 🙁

redlegleader68

Know it well!!